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Today we celebrated Balerie’s retirement from Mark’s Pest Control. 
Balerie Slye, We admire and respect how hard you’ve worked over the last 9 years with us. You not only made a huge difference but also touched a lot of lives along the way. 
Balerie will be greatly missed. She held down the fort when we were away, and held it up the other days. She is supportive, bright, kind, sharp, and a self starter. She has been everyone’s cheerleader and friend. If any of her coworkers needed guidance or support, her advice was searched out. She has become a friend to all of us through the years and her daily presence will be missed greatly. The time has come for a new chapter and we all hope that this change in life will bring her happiness, joy, relaxation and time to spend with her family.  Happy retirement Balerie!  We miss you already.Image attachmentImage attachment+3Image attachment

Today we celebrated Balerie’s retirement from Mark’s Pest Control.
Balerie Slye, We admire and respect how hard you’ve worked over the last 9 years with us. You not only made a huge difference but also touched a lot of lives along the way.
Balerie will be greatly missed. She held down the fort when we were away, and held it up the other days. She is supportive, bright, kind, sharp, and a self starter. She has been everyone’s cheerleader and friend. If any of her coworkers needed guidance or support, her advice was searched out. She has become a friend to all of us through the years and her daily presence will be missed greatly. The time has come for a new chapter and we all hope that this change in life will bring her happiness, joy, relaxation and time to spend with her family. Happy retirement Balerie! We miss you already.
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6 days ago

9 CommentsComment on Facebook

This is a day I will forever keep in my heart❤️ Thank you all for a wonderful send off into this unknown world of retirement. I have always been proud to tell that I work for Mark's Pest Control, Inc. I can’t say enough about what a great company it is to work for. Thank you Mark Woodward for being such a kind and generous boss with integrity! Jill Woodward Cox thank you for all you have done for me. Ginny Dettor if given more time, I am sure we could have come up with some shenanigans 🙄. Lisa Thompson Dale you got this👍 8 guys who are so very different, yet so much alike with your strong work ethic, I am truly amazed. Last but not least, our amazing customers who I have had the honor to get to know and look forward to working with❤️Thank you all for making me proud to be associated with an incredible group of people. I love you all❤️blessings

Congratulations Balerie! 🎉. I will never forget your compassion and thoughtfulness the day I called to cancel my appointment because our dog had just passed away. Though we never met in person and spoke only briefly about appointments (but for many years!) you mailed me a sympathy card for our loss. It was so very appreciated, as was your always pleasant phone interactions. Enjoy your retirement!

Congratulations Balerie. Enjoy your retirement.

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We went to support our friends at Saint Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church - Williamsburg, VA. For lunch at the Greek festival today.  It’s today though Sunday.  We are so happy to be the pest control provider for this church full of great people and even happier to eat their amazing food!  Go and get some baklava!  We all tried the Ek Mek dessert and it’s quite possibly the best dessert ever!  Yes, we did spend a little extra time at the dessert station and have a bag full of treats to take with us.Image attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment

We went to support our friends at Saint Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church - Williamsburg, VA. For lunch at the Greek festival today. It’s today though Sunday. We are so happy to be the pest control provider for this church full of great people and even happier to eat their amazing food! Go and get some baklava! We all tried the Ek Mek dessert and it’s quite possibly the best dessert ever! Yes, we did spend a little extra time at the dessert station and have a bag full of treats to take with us. ... See MoreSee Less

7 days ago

3 CommentsComment on Facebook

Thanks for stopping by. I’m glad you found a new favorite dessert 😘

The green beans are my absolute favorite ❣️ looks yummy

Why did I have to retire so soon! ❤️

Cicadas emerge again, make their presence known
By Diane Sofranec   
Published in the Pest Management Professional Magazine

May 23, 2024

Cicadas are back in the news. This time, it’s Brood XIX, which has a 13-year life cycle, and Brood XIII, which has a 17-year life cycle.

That’s right, these two broods are simultaneously making their way out of the ground, an event that last occurred in 1803. Although the cicadas will be prevalent in several Midwest and Southeast states, Illinois may be the only state where the two broods will emerge at the same time and place, USA Today reports.

Expect to find Brood XIX cicadas in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Expect to see Brood XIII cicadas in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan and Wisconsin. They likely will make their presence known from May through June.

These broods are periodical cicadas, meaning they have 13- or 17-year life cycles. Periodical cicadas undergo five juvenile stages while underground, and feed on fluids from roots. Their bodies are green and brown, or green and black, and they are about 0.75 to 1.5 inches long. They differ from annual cicadas, which occur every year. Annual cicadas have black bodies, red eyes and wings with orange veins. At approximately 1.5 to 2.5 inches long, they are slightly larger.

Cicadas are not pests, however customers may contact you thinking pest management professionals (PMPs) can help remove them from structures, should they find their way indoors. Media reports say people in their path will experience an “invasion” a “cicadapocalypse” and “billions” and “trillions” of cicadas this spring.

While it’s difficult to predict the number of cicadas that will actually emerge, there’s no doubt you will hear them when they do. Adult male cicadas produce species-specific “songs” and form “choruses” to attract female cicadas. Male cicadas alternate “singing” with short flights until they find their female cicada mates. The sound they make are almost always species-specific, so cicada species can be identified by their sound.

Facts for Customers:

Are not poisonous or venomous
Do not transmit disease
Do not sting or bite
Typically fly away when approached
Emerge from underground when the soil temperature rises to about 64 degrees Fahrenheit
Shed their shells and develop wings
When newly hatched, will burrow about two feet underground and remain there for the next 17 years if it is Brood XIII or 13 years if it is Brood XIX
Some South Carolina residents called police when they experienced the sounds cicadas make, AccuWeather reported. The noise complaints were taken in stride, as callers were advised they were simply hearing “the sounds of nature.”

Sources: Illinois Department of Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, The Nature Conservancy

Category:
Crawling The Web, Featured
Tags:
Cicadas

Cicadas emerge again, make their presence known
By Diane Sofranec
Published in the Pest Management Professional Magazine

May 23, 2024

Cicadas are back in the news. This time, it’s Brood XIX, which has a 13-year life cycle, and Brood XIII, which has a 17-year life cycle.

That’s right, these two broods are simultaneously making their way out of the ground, an event that last occurred in 1803. Although the cicadas will be prevalent in several Midwest and Southeast states, Illinois may be the only state where the two broods will emerge at the same time and place, USA Today reports.

Expect to find Brood XIX cicadas in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Expect to see Brood XIII cicadas in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan and Wisconsin. They likely will make their presence known from May through June.

These broods are periodical cicadas, meaning they have 13- or 17-year life cycles. Periodical cicadas undergo five juvenile stages while underground, and feed on fluids from roots. Their bodies are green and brown, or green and black, and they are about 0.75 to 1.5 inches long. They differ from annual cicadas, which occur every year. Annual cicadas have black bodies, red eyes and wings with orange veins. At approximately 1.5 to 2.5 inches long, they are slightly larger.

Cicadas are not pests, however customers may contact you thinking pest management professionals (PMPs) can help remove them from structures, should they find their way indoors. Media reports say people in their path will experience an “invasion” a “cicadapocalypse” and “billions” and “trillions” of cicadas this spring.

While it’s difficult to predict the number of cicadas that will actually emerge, there’s no doubt you will hear them when they do. Adult male cicadas produce species-specific “songs” and form “choruses” to attract female cicadas. Male cicadas alternate “singing” with short flights until they find their female cicada mates. The sound they make are almost always species-specific, so cicada species can be identified by their sound.

Facts for Customers:

Are not poisonous or venomous
Do not transmit disease
Do not sting or bite
Typically fly away when approached
Emerge from underground when the soil temperature rises to about 64 degrees Fahrenheit
Shed their shells and develop wings
When newly hatched, will burrow about two feet underground and remain there for the next 17 years if it is Brood XIII or 13 years if it is Brood XIX
Some South Carolina residents called police when they experienced the sounds cicadas make, AccuWeather reported. The noise complaints were taken in stride, as callers were advised they were simply hearing “the sounds of nature.”

Sources: Illinois Department of Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, The Nature Conservancy

Category:
Crawling The Web, Featured
Tags:
Cicadas
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2 weeks ago
This couple lived in our beautiful gray house turned office in 1910.  Estelle’s maiden name is MARKS!  Seems like we were the perfect fit more than one hundred years later!

This couple lived in our beautiful gray house turned office in 1910. Estelle’s maiden name is MARKS! Seems like we were the perfect fit more than one hundred years later! ... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

9 CommentsComment on Facebook

Somewhere down the line they were also related to the Cottrell family. When we renovated, In one of the outbuildings I found a very old travel trunk with a navy uniform in it. I forget the name in the uniform but after showing it my mom, she gave to someone whom was related in the Cottrell family

She still lives there 😳👻👻👻

I’ve loved the look of the house since the first time I noticed it! It’s gorgeous!

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Jill is working at the beverage sponsorship table at Here for the Girls, Inc. Golf Tournament at Kingsmill Golf Club today. We have been sponsors and supporters of this charity for many years and believe in all that do to help support young women with breast cancer.  It’s a beautiful day in the 80’s and sunny!  It’s a tough job but somebody had to do it.Image attachment

Jill is working at the beverage sponsorship table at Here for the Girls, Inc. Golf Tournament at Kingsmill Golf Club today. We have been sponsors and supporters of this charity for many years and believe in all that do to help support young women with breast cancer. It’s a beautiful day in the 80’s and sunny! It’s a tough job but somebody had to do it. ... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

5 CommentsComment on Facebook

Have fun ❤️

Great Charity and beautiful day!!! Have fun!!!

Looking good!!

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We are so excited to welcome Lisa to our office as scheduling coordinator today.  She will start training to take over this position when Balerie retires in June.  Welcome to our team Lisa!

We are so excited to welcome Lisa to our office as scheduling coordinator today. She will start training to take over this position when Balerie retires in June. Welcome to our team Lisa! ... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

12 CommentsComment on Facebook

Welcome Lisa. Sad to see Balerie leaving but for a great reason, enjoy retirement!

Congratulations!

Congratulations. Lisa is the best

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Mark and Maurice are keeping Iron Bound Gym pest free today!

Mark and Maurice are keeping Iron Bound Gym pest free today! ... See MoreSee Less

3 months ago

4 CommentsComment on Facebook

Looks like u are having fun

Brent Wooten on the prowl for protein

With Brent sneeking past lol

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Photos from Dream Catchers of Williamsburg's post ... See MoreSee Less

4 months ago
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Daily Press Choice Awards Winner

We are so excited to share that we won The Daily Press Choice Awards for the best pest control company in Williamsburg for every year since 2004.  

Mark's Pest Control, Inc.

PO Box 464

Lightfoot, VA 23090

Fax: +1 (757) 345 3648

Email: [email protected]

MARK'S Pest Control